thedoctorsconsultingfirebender:

timelordshavetwohearts:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

longshotlock:

When she was just a girl
She expected the world
But it flew away from her reach
So she ran away in her sleep
Dreamed of para- para- paradise
Para- para- paradise
Para- para- paradise
Every time she closed her eyes

i’m actually crying

THE PICTURE DIDNT WANNA LOAD SO I THOUGHT IT WAS SOME EMOTIONAL THING BUT INSTEAD IT’S A SHITLOAD OF FRENCH FRIES

i dont know about you but french fries make me very emotional

thedoctorsconsultingfirebender:

timelordshavetwohearts:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

longshotlock:

When she was just a girl

She expected the world

But it flew away from her reach

So she ran away in her sleep

Dreamed of para- para- paradise

Para- para- paradise

Para- para- paradise

Every time she closed her eyes

i’m actually crying

THE PICTURE DIDNT WANNA LOAD SO I THOUGHT IT WAS SOME EMOTIONAL THING BUT INSTEAD IT’S A SHITLOAD OF FRENCH FRIES

i dont know about you but french fries make me very emotional

proofmathisbeautiful:

See How Cadbury Hatches 350 Million Goo-Filled Eggs a Year

  • By Elise Craig  

Candy company Mondelēz International only sells Cadbury Créme Eggs from January through Easter, but its factories fill chocolate shells with gooey cream 364 days a year. It’s the only way to ensure 350 million eggcellent candies are ready for their plastic-grass-lined baskets. Easter shift manager (his actual title) Charles McDonald shows us how the Cadbury factory in Birmingham, England, achieves candy magic, ova and ova.

1 | Mix: Cadbury trucks in chocolate crumb, a sandy paste made from reduced cocoa liquor, milk, and sugar. Two mills grind the particles down and machines fold in cacao butter, warming the mixture to just above body temperature. The factory goes through one ton of chocolate every hour, 24 hours a day.

2 | Coat: A depositor funnels chocolate into eggcups on hinged trays (96 indentations on each side). The trays shake as they move, helping the liquid chocolate to pool in the depressions.

3 | Cream: The white and yellow fillings are made of sugar, water, glucose, and a proprietary goo called “blended syrup”—and free-range-egg powder. Why? “I think it’s a historic thing,” McDonald says. The “white” and the “yolk” have nearly identical ingredients, but the yellow contains food coloring.

4 | Fill: The chocolate-filled trays run under the cream depositor, which squirts in the white goo. The dense cream pushes the pooled chocolate up the sides of the mold. Next, the depositor shoots a smaller quantity of yellow stuff into the center; the yolk is denser than the white, so the two parts of the egg don’t mix.

5 | Cool: To make the still-wet half-eggs whole, the mold-closing machine snaps the trays shut, “like closing a book.” Air coolers solidify the eggs—slowly, to make sure a white bloom doesn’t form on the surface.

6 | Wrap: Once the eggs have hardened, a wheel picks up each one and spins it 360 degrees while small mechanical arms smooth the foil onto the surface.

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green. 
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

embrace-the-hate:

A type of joke by *JrDragao

sixpenceee:

by artist Isaac Cordal

More information about his art here

For another art piece about the detrimental state of the future